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Petulant Penguin

April 17, 2013 Existing Artist Tips, P - Q - R No Comments
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  • Petulant Penguin is an exciting and vibrant Promotions, Events and Management company with the self-appointed mission of providing the highest quality experience; musically, visually and in terms of outright experience for both artist and audience alike.

    At the heart of Petulant Penguin lies the desire to showcase talented creative minds and intertwine this with an experience unparalleled in the current music landscape; the penguins shall march forward.

    Beware the Petulant Penguin, and underestimate him at your peril, the time of the penguin is upon us.

    Darren Suckling
    Director
    Petulant Penguin
    www.petulantpenguin.co.uk

  • www.petulantpenguin.co.uk
    Martin Atkins book website: www.toursmart.tstouring.com

  • 1. Top three (or more) tips for new and emerging talent.

    1) Plan your shows/tours carefully. Rather than taking any gig that is offered to you, make sure that they will work for you in terms of audience, line-up, venue and location. It is often a good idea to build a fan base outside of London, and then once you have achieved this book a show in London.

    2) The set-list is vital. Often bands/artists don’t put a lot of thought into their set-list. You need to consider a number of things in order to grab and keep the attention of the audience.

    –  Impact.   The first and third songs in your set are the most important.  You need a catchy, attention grabbing opener with the third song being your ‘future hit’.

    –  Flow.  The set should have a coherent flow to it.

    –  Onstage chat. There are a lot of bands/artists that don’t speak to the audience at all on stage. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it is your chance to make a connection with the audience. You should plan in advance when and what you are going to say.

    3) The team around you. Build a team of people that can help you grow. You can’t do everything yourself and everyone has different strengths and weaknesses.

    2. Picking the right band members.

    Try and get the right band members from the start. This will give you stability and be able to concentrate on your plan. I have fallen foul to this before. It disrupts things and wastes a lot of time. Try not to rush into a line-up just in order for you to record or get out there gigging.

    This has happened to me. I rushed into recruiting a bass player that really didn’t fit the band. After recording an EP and starting a tour I realised that the bass player just didn’t work for the band. I then had to find the right person which had a big impact on the band’s sound and image. This resulted in a lot of wasted time and money as the original EP did not reflect the band in the way that I wanted.

    Bands will often see line-up changes throughout their life; you just have to manage this in the most effective way.

    3. Inspiration?

    Martin Atkins has played with bands including Nine Inch Nails, Ministry and PiL. He is an amazing author and entrepreneur. A great book for bands that love doing things the DIY way is Tour:Smart. It includes contributions and advice from people involved in all areas of the music industry. It tells you how it really is!

     

    Darren Suckling
    Director
    Petulant Penguin
    www.petulantpenguin.co.uk


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